Grimoire
Cthulhu
Dracula
Abraham Lincoln
Ken
Grimoire

Episode 119: Sex Argentina

December 12th, 2014 | Robin

In Ask Ken and Robin, we answer an Ian Porell question about how much writing should go into a GUMSHOE NPC, and move on from there to supply other tips on creating supporting players for investigative games.

From there we take a short hop to the Gaming Hut to look at post-mortems and other ways of eliciting player feedback.

Our Dreamhounds of Paris-inspired visits to the Consulting Occultist continue with a consideration of mystical seeker George Gurdjieff.

Finally we pick up the lobster phone in the Culture Hut to talk about Dreamhounds’ most popular player character, Salvador Dali.


Attention, class! Anchor sponsor Atlas Games wants to enroll you in Mad Scientist University, the card game of evil genius, insane assignments, and unstable elements. Act now, Ken and Robin listeners, and they’ll throw in the Spring Break expansion set for free. Shipping within the US is also free.

 

 

Then follow the esoteric clues to the Kickstarter for Weird Detective: the Tabletop Roleplaying Game. Grab the PDF corebook for a mere five bucks, piling on additional goodies as your fear-constricted heart desires.

 

13 Responses to “Episode 119: Sex Argentina”

  1. Jim L says:

    Thanks for the shout-out, gents; your podcast is a real gem.

  2. Have you ever covered Button Gwinnett, who signed the Declaration of Independence? His signature, of which there are only 51 copies, is very valuable. They say that’s only because it’s rare, but, Ken and Robin, what mystical powers might it have, and why might the players need to get a copy from a museum or private collector?

  3. Lisa Padol says:

    Just FYI — this is how I heard about Weird Detective.

  4. Derek Upham says:

    I am disappointed that the Weird Detective ad made no references to electric pentacles.

  5. Derek Upham says:

    You could have Gurdjieff’s “waking sleep” concept be a fake out, and what’s really important is his musical background, linking to a mute German viol player now living in the Rue d’Auseil.

  6. Another great show – thank you gentlemen!

    One interesting Dali connection is his relationship to Marx! No not Karl, but rather the really funny one, Harpo.

    Harpo and Dalí: a surreal double act And as Exapno Mapcase, Harpo in 1933, served as a secret courier to Moscow; delivering communiques to and from the US embassy. Indeed, this experience was retold in a “bizarre science fiction novella, The Foreign Hand Tie by Randall Garrett, a tale of telepathic spies which is full of references to the Marx Brothers”. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpo_Marx]

    This is just betting to be adopted into a “Shadows Over Filmland” scenario.

  7. […] Episode 119 of Ken and Robin Talk about Stuff covers Salvador Dali and creating supporting characters for games (useful for writers, too) […]

  8. Eoin Dornan says:

    What advice would you offer players who are taking on the role of established historical and cultural figures, who might be nervous about portraying the person “wrong”?

  9. Sidney Bishopsgates says:

    “Oh, listen to me, I’m all Canadian, don’t write too much about NPCs”” .. says the man who wrote THREE FRICKING PAGES on André Breton – you muppet!

  10. LJS says:

    Has Robin seen Laurie King’s _The Bones of Paris_ — a mystery set in 1929 Paris. Cameos by various figures, a larger part for Man Ray, and lots about the Grand-Guignol. Good atmosphere.

  11. Tim Emrick says:

    “It can all lead to, or from, Derrida.” That sentence costs me 1d4 SAN, as I flashed back to my abortive attempt at a master’s degree in English. The effort of wrapping my head around Derrida enough to engage him on his own terms (or close enough to satisfy my professor) forced me to deconstruct my own motivation as a graduate student.

Leave a Reply to Around the Podosphere: Podcasts of Note for 12/17/2014 | The Skiffy and Fanty Show Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Film Cannister
Cartoon Rocket
d8
Flying Clock
Robin
Film Cannister